Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Grand Veneur Sauce’

Lesson 24 Noisette of venisonAs we build towards the climax of Superior Cuisine and the final exam the heat is on.  Pardon the pun J.   We are charged with making one of three sauces in the final, a poivrade, diane, or grand veneur sauce.   In this practical, we must produce a grand veneur sauce.  I have to share, that after failing miserably on the execution of my poivrade sauce, my motivation to succeed in this practical was high.

Venison is a very lean red meat with a rather strong flavor as such it’s not to everyone taste.  As I am from Canada, it is quite usual to see game on the menu in mid range and high end restaurants which I happily order so I can enjoy a big red wine with my main course.

In this preparation the filet of veal is marinated whole for an hour in red wine, a mirepoix of carrot, onion and celery with a few black peppercorns.  Cooking venison requires a special touch as it is very lean.  The whole marinated filet should be seasoned with salt and pepper then quickly sautéed in vegetable oil over medium heat to brown on all sides.  Then into the oven at 180C until the internal temperature reaches 46 C for a thin filet or 52 C for a thick filet.

It is important to rest the meat for at least 5 minutes or until the internal temperature reaches max 55C then carve.  If you like your meat well done or over cook the venison, you might as well serve your leather shoe sole for dinner as will taste about the same.

Sauces should not be truly that hard at this stage of our Superior course but it seems getting the right flavor balance with the classics takes some determination. The new element in the grand veneur sauce is the addition of red currant jelly ou gelée de groseillles en Français.

It is made in the classic manner of all meat sauces.  After the trimmings are browned, the jelly is used to deglaze the pan rather than wine and adds a pleasant sweetness to the sauce.   The sauce flavor is then built up with a little red wine vinegar, a few black peppercorns, veal stock and the reduced marinade from the meat.

Overall the flavor of the sauce comes alive with the rare meat and absolutely demands a Bordeaux or Chateauneuf du Pape which suits me just fine.  It is a grand life, isn’t it!

Read Full Post »